Home > Comics, Reviews > Comic Review: Batwoman #25

Comic Review: Batwoman #25

Batwoman 25 Trevor McCarthy

This ain’t pretty.

Marc Andreyko’s writing debut is a cookiecutter Zero Year tie-in, but its the little easy cliches in the writing that really drop the quality of Batwoman #25.

The plot is your basic Zero Year tie-in. The lights in Gotham go out and Kate is in town to visit Bruce Wayne as the Kane family mourns the death of Uncle Philip.

When the power goes out, Kate’s first instinct is to go looking for thugs to beat up, so she puts a bit of blemish concealer (or something) on her face and heads out to crack some skulls.

She breaks up a jewelery heist, saves a teenager – whom she calls “little boy” – and gets nabbed by the police in the process. They give her a pat on the back, Papa Kane shows up to take her home, and we’re all done here, folks.

The only real writing of substance comes in some decent exchanges between Kate and Jacob Kane. Then, at least, you can feel some character coming through.

Not so much elsewhere.

Andreyko is just too obvious. He spells everything out. In a meeting between Kate and Bruce Wayne, for instance, Kate calls him “Cousin Bruce,” and moments later, they are interrupted by “Cousin Bette.”

I’m pretty sure they only talk like that in Jane Austen novels.

And this comic is about as tame as a drawing room in Pride and Prejudice. There’s no life, no energy, no strong voice to any of the characters. Kate is oddly chipper all the way through, and she’s surrounded by people who talk like robots.

While Andreyko’s writing is lacklustre in itself, his Zero Year plot also takes artist Trevor McCarthy’s efforts down a notch. There are no gorgeous Batwoman panels for McCarthy to show off with. Instead, he’s limited to the more straightforward Kate style.

Batwoman #25 certainly feels like a blackout. Marc Andreyko’s writing is trite, and Trevor McCarthy is boxed into a boring, formulaic layout and plotline. There’s no light here.

This is not a good start.

6 out of 10

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