Home > Comics, Reviews > Comic Review: Multiversity is Grant Morrison’s trippiest ride yet

Comic Review: Multiversity is Grant Morrison’s trippiest ride yet

Multiversity Grant Morrison Ivan Reis
Don’t let Captain Carrot on the cover scare you off: Multiversity #1 is many things, and goofy/wacky/weird are just a few of those things. Grant Morrison’s latest dimension-hopping, 52 universe-encompassing epic is all kinds of wild, and will leave you all kinds of lost, but the man knows where he’s going, and there’s no denying the mad genius behind it all.

And Grant Morrison is kind of a mad genius. If you’ve read or listened to interviews with the guy, he says he’s seen extra-dimensional visions.

Whether or not you believe that, the fact that he believes it seems to be the reason Multiversity is possible – and the reason it doesn’t fall apart under its own heady weight.

Multiversity is the wildest, headiest, most Grant Morrison-like comic book yet – and that’s saying something. It’s the kind of ride where you simply have to buckle up and hold on, because Morrison knows where he’s going, and you better trust he’ll get you there in one piece.

The premise, as simply put as possible, goes like this: a monster is attacking all 52 DC universes, and heroes from those universes must band together to stop it. It’s already killed Nix Uotan, the last universe-preserving Monitor, but not before Uotan could trigger the Multiversity’s response team initiative.

Now, led by President Superman of Earth 23, the many heroes of the multiverse must work together to figure out just what’s going on – and how to stop it. The Multiversity is their home base, and their ship is made out of music, and did I mention there’s a rabbit called Captain Carrot?

Yeah, it’s pretty out there.

But there’s a lot of fun stuff in here too, if you’re not hell-bent on understanding it all. For one, Morrison gets extremely meta extremely quickly, with the story constantly turning in on itself and talking directly to you, as a reader of comic books. In fact, the entire universe folds in on itself, with each universe contained as a comic book within another universe. So when the multiverse’s heroes are first thrown together, they’re essentially seeing the comic book characters from their world come to life.

But it goes beyond that. Just as we’ve got Marvel and DC Comics as the two big companies, the multiverse has Major and DC Comics. Our heroes even travel to one of the Major Comics worlds, where they encounter some thinly-veiled analogues of the Marvel Universe, including versions of the Avengers and the Fantastic Four.

That’s where Morrison leaves us in this issue: with the multiverse’s heroes on Earth 8, where a Doctor Doom analogue has just unleashed a reborn, but warped, version of Nix Uotan.

In terms of the art, Ivan Reis does a magnificent job keeping up with Morrison’s wild imagination. When you see the warped and twisted cloud-faces of the ruined Earth 7, you really get a sense of just how challenging Morrison’s script must be for Reis – and yet Reis manages it wonderfully. He also packs the panels with as many amazing and weird-looking characters as possible, so that it’s positively bursting with multiverse fun.

Morrison is running at full speed with this new series, and Ivan Reis absolutely keeps up.

Simply put, if you’re a fan of alternate realities and strange twists on familiar characters, then this is worth it. If you’re looking for grounded and gritty storytelling, this won’t be your cup of tea.

And if you ARE into this, head over to Comixology. They’ve got a lot of the dimension-bending stories on sale right now.

8 out of 10

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