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Posts Tagged ‘New 52’

Comic Review: Batgirl – Future’s End gives Simone’s Babs a powerful end

September 10, 2014 Leave a comment

batgirl future's end
I’ll be up front about this: I haven’t read Gail Simone’s full Batgirl run, and I can’t be the one to sum up all the good work she’s done with the character.

But I’m a big fan of girl power in comics, and Batgirl: Future’s End #1 is positively bursting with girl power done right.

The premise alone of a bulked-up, Bane-inspired badass Babs running a team of Batgirls should be enough to make you buy this comic, but the way it’s all pulled off makes it worth double the price you’ll pay for a copy.
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Comic Review: Batman Eternal #21: Meet the men behind the curtain

August 27, 2014 Leave a comment

Batman Eternal #21 Jason Fabok
Everything seemed to be falling into place for Batman and crew, meaning it was about time someone pulled the rug out from under them.

That someone is James Tynion IV, who scripts an exciting Batman #21 with artwork from Jason Fabok.

Tynion and Fabok fill a pivotal point in the Batman Eternal saga, tearing apart what resolution we thought we were about to get, and opening up a whole new avenue of excitement ahead. That comes thanks to two revelations, one that’s kind of expected, and another that may truly gobsmack you.
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Comic Review: Multiversity is Grant Morrison’s trippiest ride yet

August 20, 2014 Leave a comment

Multiversity Grant Morrison Ivan Reis
Don’t let Captain Carrot on the cover scare you off: Multiversity #1 is many things, and goofy/wacky/weird are just a few of those things. Grant Morrison’s latest dimension-hopping, 52 universe-encompassing epic is all kinds of wild, and will leave you all kinds of lost, but the man knows where he’s going, and there’s no denying the mad genius behind it all.
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Comic Review: Grayson #1 feels like Mission: Impossible 3

Grayson #1
From the perfect haircut to the face-changing to the spygames, Dick Grayson’s new world in Grayson #1 feels like somewhere Tom Cruise would be right at home.

This comic is all about espionage and double-blinds and undercover plots, with a big twist of pseudo-science thrown in. The art is good, the character rings true and there’s enough here to warrant sticking on board, though Grayson doesn’t quite leap out of the book and grab you as an issue #1 (though there’s plenty of leaping going on).

Mikel Janin handles art duties with some clean pencils, but there are a few points where you have to stop and re-read sections because he loses you in the visual logic – especially in the jumping scenes.

The comic opens with a train heist which DC readers will already know from seeing it printed in the backs of other comics all through June. Dick sneaks onto a train somewhere in Russia while wearing a blonde wig. After a run-in with a very Bond-esque femme fatale and some help from an equally Bond-esque female spy (more on her later), Dick kidnaps a fat Russian man and escapes the train using some form of chemical to make the man cooperate with him.

Dick is working for Spyral – apparently as a double-agent – helping the mysterious organization capture people to reclaim a bunch of powerful body implants that grant superpowers. His boss is swirly-faced Mister Minos, and he’s aided by a certain Helena Bertinelli, the alias of Earth-2’s Huntress. This Helena is blacker and less costumed than her alternate universe equivalent, as Nightwing readers saw at the end of that series’ last issue.

That’s not to say it’ll stay like that forever, though.

Writer Tim Seeley brings out Dick’s sense of fun in the writing and also creates a few sparks between him and Helena, but the most engaging part of the story comes in the middle, when Dick is holed up at a nuclear silo with his abductee.

As soon as Dick gets there he’s attacked by Midnighter, a cowled hero in black armour and a dark coat. Midnighter had a brief New 52 existence in Stormwatch, but that didn’t last long and had few readers. Instead, it appears the character will get some work in this title as a good guy-foe while Dick works undercover.

Grayson #1 is admirable if only because it takes DC’s most-developed character and develops him even more. It’s easy to tell DC has a lot plotted out for this character in the future, and while this first issue doesn’t wow, it does suggest plenty of layers that we’ll get to see peeled back in issues to come.

Oh, and the gun on the cover? Dick never uses one. We’ll see if that keeps up.

7.5 out of 10

Batman Eternal #12 gets ambitious – and delivers

Batman Eternal #12 cover
Batman Eternal #12 is, front-to-back, the most solidly-constructed issue of this series so far. Mikel Janin’s art is clean, crisp and firmly rooted in the Bat-verse, while James Tynion IV’s script is expertly-paced and well-delivered.

For the first time in a while, the art here is an absolute treat. At first look, Janin’s work appears simply solid. But on closer inspection, it starts to become clear just how much Janin has done his homework. His work is many-layered, drawn with all the dedication of a true Batman devotee.

In one scene, Batman is disguised as a helmeted prison guard, yet it’s clear who he is immediately, simply from the stern shape of his jaw and the way he frowns. That same scene includes a wonderful nod to Greg Capullo’s Death of the Family artwork, as Janin recreates the haunting bridge shot from when the Joker first confronted Batman with his plans to destroy the Bat-family.

The story has layers, too. Where past issues have been tripped up by too many plotlines, Tynion does a fantastic job of threading all the disparate storylines together. We get one scene with each storyline, and those single scenes are all just enough to whet the appetite. Red Robin, Batgirl/Red Hood, Bard, Gordon, Batman, Harper Row and Alfred/Julia Pennyworth all get time in this story, and yet it doesn’t feel bloated.

Batman Eternal #12 finally feels like there’s a strong hand guiding this ship. With superb art, deft plotting and a strong command of the many characters at play, Batman Eternal #12 is simply wonderful.

9 out of 10